Grilled Pheasant on Sticks with Spicy-Peanut Dipping Sauce: Pheasant Satay

Since the pheasant originally hails from the East, it only makes since that its meat both accommodates and accentuates Eastern spices and recipes. The dish satay, though its origin remains unclear, is traditionally believed to have originated in Indonesian or Malaysia as a street vendor adaption of Indian kebabs. Marinated in a mix of special spices and skewered with bamboo sticks then grilled over an open flame, this variation of pheasant makes for quite a treat when you pair it with a Thai peanut sauce made famous by The Elk Public House in Spokane, Washington. Satay can be served over jasmine rice or ketupat (rice dumplings). Feel free to forego the homemade marinade recipe and instead marinate your pheasants strip in your favorite store-bought sauce. However, be certain not to miss out on this great-tasting Thai peanut dipping or drizzle sauce.  Continue reading “Grilled Pheasant on Sticks with Spicy-Peanut Dipping Sauce: Pheasant Satay”

The Airline Cut: Grilled Rosemary Pheasant with Red Curry Sauce

For most wingshooters, when it comes to preparing their birds, there are typically two options: breasts and thighs, or the longer—but also more rewarding—process of plucking the entire fowl. However, a happy medium exists between these two choices, one that saves time but also offers the benefits of bone-in, skin-on pheasant.
 
An airline cut saves skin, resulting in a crispier exterior, while also leaving a drumette attached. While some chefs argue bone-in proteins don’t add extra flavor, I tend to disagree, since I believe innate flavors present in bones seep out into meat during cooking. As well, leaving the drumette attached allows for a more even cook and a juicer piece of pheasant once done grilling.     Continue reading “The Airline Cut: Grilled Rosemary Pheasant with Red Curry Sauce”