A Belated St. Paddy’s, Lenten Feast: Fried Walleye with Irish Colcannon

I thought I knew a good fish fry, until I moved to Minnesota, where the state fish, the ever-famous walleye, was a game changer. I had fried everything from bass to cod to trout during my years in the Pacific Northwest. While I thoroughly enjoyed those suppers, nothing quite beats a walleye—the way it melts in your mouth, how its flavor balances perfectly with spices inside a golden-brown crust. Continue reading “A Belated St. Paddy’s, Lenten Feast: Fried Walleye with Irish Colcannon”

Real Hunters Know Their Gravies: Roasted Grouse with Hunter-Style Gravy

The origin of hunter-style gravy, or “sauce chasseur” as the French call it, remains rather unclear. Seen on modern menus today, the term hunter-style or hunter’s sauce typically refers to a recipe that includes sautéed mushrooms and is made from beef demi-glace. Some sources suggest the sauce got its name from the practice of hunters returning home from a successful hunt and foraging for mushrooms along their route. Other sources speculate instead of wine—a common ingredient in modern hunter-style gravies—hunters employed the blood from their kill in the recipe. I prefer to believe the latter and have sought to create a recipe that aims to celebrate the ritualistic nature of returning home from the woods after a great day bagging grouse. Continue reading “Real Hunters Know Their Gravies: Roasted Grouse with Hunter-Style Gravy”

Quick, Hot, Delish: Pheasant Teriyaki Stir-Fry

Teriyaki, when loosely translated, refers to both the shiny and grilled nature of the dish. The teriyaki method of cooking originated in Japan hundreds of years ago, though, today, variations of the sauce and technique vary throughout the world. Still, most recipes follow the fundamentals: grilled or broiled meat tossed in a sauce reduction of soy sauce, mirin and honey or sugar.         Continue reading “Quick, Hot, Delish: Pheasant Teriyaki Stir-Fry”

Grilled Pheasant on Sticks with Spicy-Peanut Dipping Sauce: Pheasant Satay

Since the pheasant originally hails from the East, it only makes since that its meat both accommodates and accentuates Eastern spices and recipes. The dish satay, though its origin remains unclear, is traditionally believed to have originated in Indonesian or Malaysia as a street vendor adaption of Indian kebabs. Marinated in a mix of special spices and skewered with bamboo sticks then grilled over an open flame, this variation of pheasant makes for quite a treat when you pair it with a Thai peanut sauce made famous by The Elk Public House in Spokane, Washington. Satay can be served over jasmine rice or ketupat (rice dumplings). Feel free to forego the homemade marinade recipe and instead marinate your pheasants strip in your favorite store-bought sauce. However, be certain not to miss out on this great-tasting Thai peanut dipping or drizzle sauce.  Continue reading “Grilled Pheasant on Sticks with Spicy-Peanut Dipping Sauce: Pheasant Satay”